Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
terms rather than putting faith in an elected official and crossing our fingers and hoping to do what we want. specifically for a contemporary example, the students into bed or on strikes for months because there was a proposed tuition hike that they said was completely unacceptable. it tried to make practice illegal. what has come of this? the tuition hike did not go through and the law forbidding process was repealed. i think -- >> would you please ask a specific question. >> i know. my question, i suppose, would be what do you see is the value of social movements for political change. >> thank you. >> thank you very much for that example. i think hopefully folks realize that actually the reason i was asked to testify before rumors of congress was because of my work on such a social movement. there were students on our campus who organized collectively to address this concern with our insurance and who saw that georgetown was providing an subsidizing contraception on insurance for their employees but not for students, even as students were paying entirely for their own insurance. and s
in the election of 1956. ben hogan for president. if we are going to have a golfer, let's have a good one. [laughter] eisenhower was franklin roosevelt's first choice to command the d-day invasion. eisenhower had three amphibious landings under his belt at that time. he got along well with the british and was churchill. that was very important and professor roosevelt there was no question he was going to pick eisenhower although he gave general marshal the opportunity to accept -- text to command the invasion if he wanted and eisenhower was characteristic, self disciplined, refused to express an opinion and president roosevelt selected ike. no one else could develop the western armies together as he could and his decision to land on d-day in spite of the weather caught the germans totally by surprise. they had no idea that innovation was coming. can you imagine 5000 ships in the english channel and the germans not knowing it because of the weather? that happened. the decision to want to take pairs with ike's decision, to take paris was his decision as well. they were to bypass pairs and c
or became. um, the big issue, the big change began in 1980, of course, with the election of ronald reagan because ronald reagan brought with him to washington, um, a very underrated figure in recent american history, someone who i don't think gets his due as an important person, and that's edwin meese. because edwin meese at first as an adviser and then as attorney general said, look, there has been a liberal ayen da at the supreme court -- agenda at the supreme court, there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power, end racial preferences intended to assist african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation
fellowships of the hunting library in the colman center for writers and scholars and is an elected member of the american academy of arts and sciences. light is committed to doing the work of the public historian as well answer some numerous boards of museums and historical societies and is a member of the advisory board for the curators of the 9/11 museum. as i mentioned before, he has taught me so very much and served as one of my most frequent sources for my documentary, looking for lincoln, my book lincoln on race and slavery and for a new film project, the african-americans many rivers to cross. it is my great honor and privilege to present this evening the anisfeld-wolf book award for nonfiction to my friend and my teacher, david blight. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> my goodness. skip i actually just wanted to keep sitting there and let you keep going. i don't want to talk about the book. let's listen to skip. if i may borrow a word from isabella, suppose, what a beautiful word to start almost every line with. suppose there was a place that celebrated books, suppose there was a book award i
be governed through the most austere totalitarian means and once that collapsed the we have an elected government in tripoli it cannot project power beyond greater tripoli. you have a problem of governmental incapacity in libya that cannot deal with the crisis. egypt is different. egypt you have a country that has been an age old cluster of civilization for years. a cohesive community along the nile aware the government has greater bureaucratic and institutional power even under this new tenuis regime than the government in libya. the government in egypt has an army and police forces but the problem is political. can an islamic government take action against islamic them craters demonstrators. >> to take the other issue you are talking about this week, iran is a big theme in your book. you talk in one chapter about the iranian pet. the prime minister of israel sees iran very much in terms of the munich analogy. iran heading for having nuclear weapons capability that could threaten the existence of israel so the policy conclusions from that, you have a broader geographical and historica
person. someone who never sought elected officings and so he didn't do a whole lot to promote himself, although he lived a long life into the late 1800s, 1894 he died, but he retreated in the last 20 years of life into pretty much a private world and didn't promote himself. i also think that soon after the war was over, very soon after the war was over, much of the nation was guided by or inspired by a desire for reconciliation among whites, too bad for anybody else, and holt did not represent that point of view. he was very distressed at the repeated way the nation was unifieded and the former slaves' welfare was banded, and so he was a contrarian, and, again, didn't have a place in that narrative that was being created after the war, or a place for being celebrated in the way that the narrative was being developed after the war so he retreated, and he -- he was bitter, actually, at the end, but he sort of retreated to his private world, and he tried to reconstruct some relationships with family members, descendants of his own generation, nephew and niece in particular, and he clung
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)